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Faith & Finance

Christian talk radio with Rob West

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Broadcast Episode

Monday, July 01

Living Wisely in Either Prosperity or Adversity

In the First Century B. C. , Roman historian Sallust said, “Prosperity tries the souls, even of the wise. ”Most people would choose financial prosperity despite its temptations. But what if you’re living with financial adversity? Today, we’ll talk about how to be wise in good times and bad. The Temptations of Financial Success and Adversity

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About Faith & Finance

How does your faith in Jesus influence your daily financial decisions? As believers, our faith must be the foundation of our financial stewardship, which is why we're excited to announce that the MoneyWise radio show is now Faith & Finance. Join Rob West and special guests as they address today’s financial questions with biblical answers. To be a part of the broadcast, call 1 (800) 525-7000 or you can email your questions to: [email protected]

More from Faith & Finance

Broadcast Episode

Friday, July 19

Giving To Children and Grandchildren with Ron Blue

“A good man leaves an inheritance to his children's children, but the sinner's wealth is laid up for the righteous. ” - Proverbs 13: 22That verse seems pretty straightforward … but it leaves several questions unanswered. What should we leave to our kids…how much…, and when? Ron Blue joins us today with the answers. Ron Blue is the Co-Founder of Kingdom Advisors and the author of many books on biblical finance, including Splitting Heirs: Giving Your Money and Things to Your Children Without Ruining Their Lives. When To Leave Money to Your Kids and When Not ToMany people wonder if Proverbs 13: 22 means they must leave money to their children and grandchildren. This verse should be seen as a principle rather than a command. In biblical times, wealth stayed within the family because no charitable organizations existed. Today, leaving a financial inheritance is a personal decision, not a mandate. If you believe God owns everything, the final decision you make as a steward is who receives His resources. If you think your heirs might misuse or squander the inheritance, it’s worth reconsidering. Money can be harmful without wisdom, whereas wisdom can create and sustain wealth. The fundamental principle is to impart wisdom before leaving money. If your children and grandchildren still need to gain the wisdom to manage resources responsibly, leaving them money can do more harm than good. Wisdom should always precede financial inheritance. When making decisions regarding wealth transfer, asking the right questions is crucial. A good question is, “If we leave this money to this child, what's the worst thing that can happen? " This question can help anticipate potential consequences and make informed decisions based on the likely outcomes. Treating Heirs Uniquely It's essential to understand that treating your children equally doesn't mean giving them the same financial inheritance. Each child is unique, and their needs and circumstances vary. Just as God treats us uniquely according to what’s best for us, parents should consider each child's needs and potential consequences when deciding on wealth transfer. The goal is to ensure that any financial inheritance supports and enhances the lives of your heirs rather than causing harm. By asking the right questions and understanding the unique needs of each child, you can make decisions that honor God's resources and benefit your family in the long term. Ron Blue’s book, "Splitting Heirs: Giving Your Money and Things to Your Children Without Ruining Their Lives, " is a must-read for those navigating this complex topic, offering detailed guidance and thoughtful advice. On Today’s Program, Rob Answers Listener Questions: I need help managing my finances throughout my career, including multiple jobs and retirement accounts. Can you advise me on getting a financial advisor or someone to help me keep track of everything? I want to ask about cashing in several Savings Bonds I purchased in 1998. Since then, I have moved several times and cannot locate the bonds. Can I cash them in without having the physical bonds, or am I out of luck? Is it too late for me to buy a home? I am 58 years old and earn $98, 000 per year. Home prices are costly right now, so I wanted advice on whether I should still pursue buying a home or if I am too old. I want to make a biblically sound decision. Is it biblical for my husband to have complete control over our finances and not allow me to use any money other than what he gives me for groceries each week? He reviews the grocery receipts to ensure I haven't purchased anything else. I shouldn't have to ask permission for every purchase since I am an adult, but he thinks this is the proper way to handle our finances. Resources Mentioned: Splitting Heirs: Giving Your Money and Things to Your Children Without Ruining Their Lives by Ron BlueTreasuryDirect. govRich Toward God: A Study on the Parable of the Rich FoolFind a Certified Kingdom Advisor (CKA) or Certified Christian Financial Counselor (CertCFC)FaithFi App

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Broadcast Episode

Friday, July 19

Giving To Children and Grandchildren with Ron Blue

“A good man leaves an inheritance to his children's children, but the sinner's wealth is laid up for the righteous. ” - Proverbs 13: 22That verse seems pretty straightforward … but it leaves several questions unanswered. What should we leave to our kids…how much…, and when? Ron Blue joins us today with the answers. Ron Blue is the Co-Founder of Kingdom Advisors and the author of many books on biblical finance, including Splitting Heirs: Giving Your Money and Things to Your Children Without Ruining Their Lives. When To Leave Money to Your Kids and When Not ToMany people wonder if Proverbs 13: 22 means they must leave money to their children and grandchildren. This verse should be seen as a principle rather than a command. In biblical times, wealth stayed within the family because no charitable organizations existed. Today, leaving a financial inheritance is a personal decision, not a mandate. If you believe God owns everything, the final decision you make as a steward is who receives His resources. If you think your heirs might misuse or squander the inheritance, it’s worth reconsidering. Money can be harmful without wisdom, whereas wisdom can create and sustain wealth. The fundamental principle is to impart wisdom before leaving money. If your children and grandchildren still need to gain the wisdom to manage resources responsibly, leaving them money can do more harm than good. Wisdom should always precede financial inheritance. When making decisions regarding wealth transfer, asking the right questions is crucial. A good question is, “If we leave this money to this child, what's the worst thing that can happen? " This question can help anticipate potential consequences and make informed decisions based on the likely outcomes. Treating Heirs Uniquely It's essential to understand that treating your children equally doesn't mean giving them the same financial inheritance. Each child is unique, and their needs and circumstances vary. Just as God treats us uniquely according to what’s best for us, parents should consider each child's needs and potential consequences when deciding on wealth transfer. The goal is to ensure that any financial inheritance supports and enhances the lives of your heirs rather than causing harm. By asking the right questions and understanding the unique needs of each child, you can make decisions that honor God's resources and benefit your family in the long term. Ron Blue’s book, "Splitting Heirs: Giving Your Money and Things to Your Children Without Ruining Their Lives, " is a must-read for those navigating this complex topic, offering detailed guidance and thoughtful advice. On Today’s Program, Rob Answers Listener Questions: I need help managing my finances throughout my career, including multiple jobs and retirement accounts. Can you advise me on getting a financial advisor or someone to help me keep track of everything? I want to ask about cashing in several Savings Bonds I purchased in 1998. Since then, I have moved several times and cannot locate the bonds. Can I cash them in without having the physical bonds, or am I out of luck? Is it too late for me to buy a home? I am 58 years old and earn $98, 000 per year. Home prices are costly right now, so I wanted advice on whether I should still pursue buying a home or if I am too old. I want to make a biblically sound decision. Is it biblical for my husband to have complete control over our finances and not allow me to use any money other than what he gives me for groceries each week? He reviews the grocery receipts to ensure I haven't purchased anything else. I shouldn't have to ask permission for every purchase since I am an adult, but he thinks this is the proper way to handle our finances. Resources Mentioned: Splitting Heirs: Giving Your Money and Things to Your Children Without Ruining Their Lives by Ron BlueTreasuryDirect. govRich Toward God: A Study on the Parable of the Rich FoolFind a Certified Kingdom Advisor (CKA) or Certified Christian Financial Counselor (CertCFC)FaithFi App

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Broadcast Episode

Friday, July 19

Giving To Children and Grandchildren with Ron Blue

“A good man leaves an inheritance to his children's children, but the sinner's wealth is laid up for the righteous. ” - Proverbs 13: 22That verse seems pretty straightforward … but it leaves several questions unanswered. What should we leave to our kids…how much…, and when? Ron Blue joins us today with the answers. Ron Blue is the Co-Founder of Kingdom Advisors and the author of many books on biblical finance, including Splitting Heirs: Giving Your Money and Things to Your Children Without Ruining Their Lives. When To Leave Money to Your Kids and When Not ToMany people wonder if Proverbs 13: 22 means they must leave money to their children and grandchildren. This verse should be seen as a principle rather than a command. In biblical times, wealth stayed within the family because no charitable organizations existed. Today, leaving a financial inheritance is a personal decision, not a mandate. If you believe God owns everything, the final decision you make as a steward is who receives His resources. If you think your heirs might misuse or squander the inheritance, it’s worth reconsidering. Money can be harmful without wisdom, whereas wisdom can create and sustain wealth. The fundamental principle is to impart wisdom before leaving money. If your children and grandchildren still need to gain the wisdom to manage resources responsibly, leaving them money can do more harm than good. Wisdom should always precede financial inheritance. When making decisions regarding wealth transfer, asking the right questions is crucial. A good question is, “If we leave this money to this child, what's the worst thing that can happen? " This question can help anticipate potential consequences and make informed decisions based on the likely outcomes. Treating Heirs Uniquely It's essential to understand that treating your children equally doesn't mean giving them the same financial inheritance. Each child is unique, and their needs and circumstances vary. Just as God treats us uniquely according to what’s best for us, parents should consider each child's needs and potential consequences when deciding on wealth transfer. The goal is to ensure that any financial inheritance supports and enhances the lives of your heirs rather than causing harm. By asking the right questions and understanding the unique needs of each child, you can make decisions that honor God's resources and benefit your family in the long term. Ron Blue’s book, "Splitting Heirs: Giving Your Money and Things to Your Children Without Ruining Their Lives, " is a must-read for those navigating this complex topic, offering detailed guidance and thoughtful advice. On Today’s Program, Rob Answers Listener Questions: I need help managing my finances throughout my career, including multiple jobs and retirement accounts. Can you advise me on getting a financial advisor or someone to help me keep track of everything? I want to ask about cashing in several Savings Bonds I purchased in 1998. Since then, I have moved several times and cannot locate the bonds. Can I cash them in without having the physical bonds, or am I out of luck? Is it too late for me to buy a home? I am 58 years old and earn $98, 000 per year. Home prices are costly right now, so I wanted advice on whether I should still pursue buying a home or if I am too old. I want to make a biblically sound decision. Is it biblical for my husband to have complete control over our finances and not allow me to use any money other than what he gives me for groceries each week? He reviews the grocery receipts to ensure I haven't purchased anything else. I shouldn't have to ask permission for every purchase since I am an adult, but he thinks this is the proper way to handle our finances. Resources Mentioned: Splitting Heirs: Giving Your Money and Things to Your Children Without Ruining Their Lives by Ron BlueTreasuryDirect. govRich Toward God: A Study on the Parable of the Rich FoolFind a Certified Kingdom Advisor (CKA) or Certified Christian Financial Counselor (CertCFC)FaithFi App

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Broadcast Episode

Thursday, July 18

Talking Inheritance

The Puritan poet Anne Bradstreet once wrote, “Wisdom without an inheritance is better than an inheritance without wisdom. ”As Baby Boomers age, it’s estimated they’ll leave a tidal wave of wealth to their heirs, perhaps as much as $68 trillion by 2030. But is the next generation ready for that wealth? The Biblical Perspective on Inheritance Anne Bradstreet’s wisdom likely stemmed from Ecclesiastes 7:11-12, highlighting wisdom's value alongside an inheritance. This biblical perspective underscores the importance of preparing heirs with wealth and the wisdom to manage it. Current State of Wealth Transfer Preparedness

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Broadcast Episode

Wednesday, July 17

Does Your Budget Reflect Your Priorities? with Brian Holtz

“Therefore do not be foolish, but understand what the Lord’s will is.” - Ephesians 5:17 That verse is a good reminder that to follow God's will, we must first know it for all areas of our lives—including finances. Brian Holtz joins us today with a question: Does your budget reflect God’s priorities or yours? Brian Holtz is the Chief Operating Officer at Compass Financial Ministry and the author of Financial Discipleship for Families: Intentionally Raising Faithful Children.

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